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SheriC

Portable Monsters

Reading, for me, is entertainment and an escape from the real world. But it can also inform and stretch the boundaries of the life I live.

Currently reading

The Alienist (Audio)
Caleb Carr, Julie Carr, Edward Herrmann
The Book of Lost Things
John Connolly
Progress: 99/339 pages
Peanuts Classics
Charles M. Schulz
Progress: 66 %
The Bungalow Mystery
Carolyn Keene
Progress: 192/192 pages
The Bungalow Mystery #3
Carolyn Keene
Progress: 192/192 pages
The Bungalow Mystery
P.M. Carlson, Russell H. Tandy, Carolyn Keene
Progress: 204/204 pages

PM’s Favorite/Essential History Reading List (1 of 2)

Duel of Eagles: The Mexican and U.S. Fight for the Alamo - Jeff Long Stephen Fry's Victorian Secrets - John Woolf, Nick Baker, Stephen Fry The Midnight Assassin: Panic, Scandal, and the Hunt for America's First Serial Killer - Skip Hollandsworth The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer - Kate Summerscale The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl - Timothy Egan Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde - Jeff Guinn The Diary of a Young Girl - B.M. Mooyaart, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anne Frank

My submission for Chris's crowdsourced nonfiction history reading list. I don’t read a lot of history, but I do read a lot of historical crime, biographies, and memoirs. I’m assuming that the bio/memoirs will be a different list. I hope so, because I’m looking forward to the recommendations. Anyway, here’s my list, arranged by timeframe/historical period, and divided into two posts.

 

Duel of Eagles: The Mexican and U.S. Fight for the Alamo (Texas History)

A more comprehensive, and honest, look at the Texas war for independence from Mexico than found in the Texas Dept of Ed approved textbooks. My review here.

 

Stephen Fry's Victorian Secrets (Victorian Period)

Not sure if this fits in a serious history reading list as this audiobook is more in the style of a podcast series, but it is underpinned by the work of actual historians. And it’s narrated/hosted by Stephen Fry!

 

The Midnight Assassin: Panic, Scandal, and the Hunt for America's First Serial Killer (Texas History, Victorian Period)

A must for Texas History buffs, because it delves deeply into Austin/Central Texas regional history and examines the process (and limits) of 19th century forensics, law enforcement, and justice. Bonus discussion of Jack the Ripper, as some have theorized that the crimes could have the same perpetrator. My review here

 

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer (Victorian Period)

I learned a great deal about Victorian London and Victorian attitudes toward mental health treatment.

 

The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl (The Great Depression)

From the political and economic drivers to the environmental and land-management fiascos that caused the Dust Bowl, and even looking forward to a possible future recurrence, this book tells the story of the Dust Bowl. Emphasis on the stories of the people who stayed, rather than the “Okies” who left.

 

Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde (The Great Depression)

They were most definitely not Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. More than just the story of the famous couple and their crimes, the author explores the socioeconomic drivers behind the life of crime and the public and law enforcement response to it, as well as some local tidbits of history about the city of Dallas and the Texas penal system.  

 

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl (World War II)

The original account, as edited by her father prior to publication.